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CHEMTRAILS

Anyone who has the book, "The gods of Eden," by William Bramley should dig it out and read or reread Chapter 18, "The Black Death," starting on page 179. This book was published in 1989, years before the Chemtrails. There are places in that chapter that sound like they could have been written today. Below are a few quotes, enough to give you an idea of the parallels between the middle age plagues and what's happening today with the Chemtrails.

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Photo of spraying; from the Contrail Connection

The Black Death began in Asia and soon spread to Europe where it killed well over 25 million people (about one third of Europe's total population) in less than four years. Some historians put the casualty figure closer to 35 to 40 million people, or about half of all Europeans............

Two types of plague are believed to have caused the Black Death. The first is the "bubonic" type, which was the most common. The bubonic form of plague is characterized by swellings of the lymph nodes: the swellings are called "buboes," The buboes are accompanied by vomiting, fever and death............ This form of plague is not contagious between human beings; it requires an active carrier, such as a flea. For this reason, many historians believe that flea-infested rodents caused the Bubonic Plague...........

The second form of plague contributing to the Black Death is a highly contagious type known as "pneumonic" plague. It is marked by shivering, rapid breathing and the coughing up of blood............... This second type of plague is nearly always fatal and transmits best in cold weather and in poor ventilation. Some physicians today believe it was this second form, the "pneumonic" plague, which was responsible for most of the casualties of the Black Death because of the crowding and poor hygienic conditions then prevalent in Europe.

We would normally shake our heads at this tragic period of human history and be thankful that modern medicine has developed cures for these dread diseases. However, troubling enigmas about the Black Death still linger. Many outbreaks occurred in summer during warm weather in uncrowded regions. Not all outbreaks of bubonic plague were preceded by rodent infestation; in fact, only a minority of cases seemed to be related to an increase in the presence of vermin. The greatest puzzle about the Black Death is how it was able to strike isolated human populations which had no contact with earlier infected areas. The epidemics also tended to end abruptly...........

A great many people throughout Europe and other Plague stricken regions of the world were reporting that outbreaks of the Plague were caused by foul-smelling "mists". Those mists frequently appeared after unusually bright lights in the sky. The historian quickly discovers that "mists" were reported far more frequently and in many more locations than were rodent infestations. The Plague years were, in fact, a period of heavy UFO activity.

What, then, were the mysterious mists? There is another very important way in which plague germs can be transmitted; through germ weapons. The US and the Soviet Union today have stockpiles of biological weapons containing bubonic plague and other epidemic diseases. The germs are kept alive in canisters which spray the diseases into the air on thick, often visible, artificial mists. Anyone breathing in the mist will inhale the disease. There are enough such germ weapons today to wipe out a good portion of humanity. Reports of identical disease-inducing mists from the Plague years strongly suggest that the Black Death was caused by germ warfare. Let us take a look at the incredible reports which lead to that conclusion.

The first outbreak of the Plague in Europe followed an unusual series of events. Between 1298 and 1314, seven large "comets" were seem over Europe; one was of "awe-inspiring blackness." .................. To the people of Europe, these sightings were considered omens of the Plague which soon followed.

It is true that some reported "comets" were probably just that; comets.......... On the other hand it is important to note that almost any unusual object in the sky was called a "comet." .............
This leads us to wonder how many other ancient "comets" were actually similar rocketlike objects. When we are confronted with an old report of a comet, we therefore do not really know what kind of thing we are dealing with unless there is a fuller description. A report of a sudden increase in "comets" or similar celestial phenomena may, in fact, mean an increase in UFO activity.

The link between unusual aerial phenomena and the Black Death was established immediately during the first outbreaks of the Plague in Asia. As one historian tells us: The first reports (of the plague) came out of the East. They were confused, exaggerated, frightening, as reports from that quarter of the world so often are; descriptions of storms and earthquakes; of meteors and comets trailing noxious gases that killed trees and destroyed the fertility of the land.

The above passage indicates that strange flying objects were doing more than just spreading disease; they were also apparently spraying chemical or biological defoliants from the air. The above passage echoes the ancient Mesopotamian tablets which described defoliation of the landscape by ancient Custodial "gods.".........

The connection between aerial phenomena and plague had begun centuries before the Black Death. We saw examples in our earlier discussion of Justinians's plague. We read from another source about a large plague that had reportedly broken out in the year 1117 -- almost 250 years before the Black Death. That plague was also preceded by unusual celestial phenomena........

Once the medieval Black Death got started, noteworthy aerial phenomena continued to accompany the dread epidemic..............

Sightings of unusual aerial phenomena usually occurred from several minutes to a year before an outbreak of Plague. Where there was a gap between such a sighting and the arrival of the Plague, a second phenomenon was sometimes reported: The appearance of frightening humanlike figures dressed in black. Those figures were often seen on the outskirts of a town or village and their presence would signal the outbreak of an epidemic almost immediately. A summary written in 1682 tells of one such visit a century earlier:

In Brandengurg (Germany) there appeared in 1559 horrible men of whom at first fifteen and later on twelve were seen......... the others (had) fearful faces and long scythes, with which they cut at the oats, so that the swish could be heard at a great distance, but the oats remained standing........ The visit of the strange men to the oat fields was followed immediately by a severe outbreak of the Plague in Brandenburg.

This incident raises intriguing questions: who were the mysterious figures? What were the long scythe-like instruments they had that emitted a loud swishing sound? It appears that the "scythes" may have been long instruments designed to spray poison or germ-laden gas. This would mean that the townspeople misinterpreted the movement of the "scythes" as an attempt to cut oats when, in fact, the movements were the act of spraying aerosols on the town. Similar men dressed in black were reported in Hungary........... there appeared so many black riders that the opinion was prevalent that the Turks were making a secret raid, but who rapidly disappeared again, and thereupon a raging plague broke out in the neighborhood.

Strange men dressed in black, "demons" and other terrifying figures were observed in other European communities. The frightening creatures were often observed carrying long "brooms," "scythes," or "swords" that were used to "sweep" or "knock at" the doors of people's homes. The inhabitants of those homes fell ill with plague afterwards. It is from these reports that people created the popular image of "Death" as a skeleton or demon carrying a scythe. The scythe came to symbolize the act of Death mowing down people like stalks of grain.........

Of all the phenomena connected to the Black Death, by far the most frequently reported were the strange, noxious "mists." The vapors were often observed even when other phenomena were not.
Mr. Nohl points out that moist pestilential fogs were "a feature which preceded the epidemic throughout its whole course." A great many physicians of the time took it for granted that the strange mists caused the Plague. The connection was established at the very beginning of the Black Death.

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